Surgical Reconstruction of Defects of the Jaws Medical Assignment Help

CHAPTER OUT LINE

BIOLOGIC BASIS OF BONE RECONSTRUCTION
Two-Phase Theory of Osteogenesis
Immune Response
TYPES OF GRAFTS
Autoqenous Grafts
Advantages
Disadvantages
Allogeneic Grafts
Advantages
Disadvantages
Xenogeneic Grafts
Advantages
Disadvantages
Combinations of Grafts

Advantages
Disadvantages
ASSESSMENT OF PATIENT IN NEED OF
RECONSTRUCTION
Hard Tissue Defect
Soft Tissue Defect
Associated Problems
GOALS -AND PRINCIPLES OF MANDIBULAR
RECONSTRUCTION
Restoration of Continuity
Restoration of Alveolar Bone Height
Restoration of Osseous Bulk
SURGICAL PRINCIPLES OF MAXILLOFACIAL BONEGRAFTING
PROCEDURE

Defects of the facial bones,  the jaws, have a variety of causes, such as eradication of pathologic conditions, trauma, infections, and congenital deformities. The size of the defects that are commonly reconstructed in the oral and maxillofacial region varies considerably from small alveolar clefts to mandibu!cctomy- defects. Each defect poses a unique set of problems that reconstructive surgical intervention must address. In each of these instances restoration of normal structure is usually possible, with resultant
improvement in function and appearance. Vben an osseous structure is defective either in size, shape, position, or amount, reconstructive surgery can replace the defective structure. The tissue most common Iy used to replace lost osseous tissue is bone. Bone grafting has been attempted for centuries with varying degrees of success. Recent advancements in the understanding of bone physiology, imniunologic concepts, tissue-banking
procedures, and surgical principles have made possible the successful reconstruction of most maxillofacial bony defects. 5 such, the biology and principles of transplantation of bone are presented in this chapter.

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