Principles of Management of Impacted Teeth Medical Assignment Help

Principles of Management of Impacted Teeth

INDICATIONS FOR REMOVAL OF IMPACTED-TEETH
Prevention of Periodontal Disease
Prevention of Dental Caries
Prevention of Pericoronitis
Prevention of Root Resorption
Impacted Teeth under a Dental Prosthesis
Prevention of Odontogenic Cysts and Tumors
Treatment of Pain of Unexplained Origin
Prevention of Fracture of the Jaw
Facilitation of Orthodontic Treatment
Optimal Periodontal Healing
CONTRAINDICATIONS FOR REMOVAL OF IMPACTED
TEETH
Extremes of Age •
Compromised Medical Status, .
Probable Excessive Damage to Adjacent Structures
Summary
CLASSIFICATION SYSTEMS OF IMPACTED TEETH
Angulation
Relationship to Anterior Bordet of Ramus
Relationship to Occlusal Plane
Summary
ROOT MORPHOLOGY
Size of Follicular Sac
Density of Surrounding. Bone
Contact with Mandibular Second Molar
Relationship to Inferior Alveolar Nerve
Nature of Overlying TIssue
MODIFICATION OF CLASSIFICATION SYSTEMS FOR
MAXILLARY IMPACTED TEETH
DIFFICULTY OF REMOVAL OF OTHER IMPAETED TEETH
SURGICAL PROCEDURE
PERIOPERATIVE PATIENT MANAGEMENT

A impacted tooth is one that fails to erupt into the dental arch within the expected time. The tooth becomes impacted because adjacent teeth, dense overlying bone, or  xcessive soft tissue prevents eruption. Because impacted teeth do not erupt, they are retained for the patient’s lifetime unless surgically removed. The term unerupted includes both impacted teeth and teeth that are in the process of erupting. The term embedded
is occasionally used interchangeably with the term impacted teeth most often become impacted because of inadequate dental arch length and space in which to erupt; that is, the total length of the alveolar bone arch is small:’
er than the total length of the tooth arch. The most com mon impacted teeth are the maxillary and mandibular hird molars, followed by the maxillary canines ana mandibular premolars. The third molars are the most frequently impacted, because they are the last’ teeth to erupt; therefore they a e the most likely to have inadequate space for eruption n the anterior maxilla, the canine tooth is also comruonlv revented from erupting by crowding from other eeth I he canine tooth usually erupts after the maxillary ateral incisor and maxillary first premolar. If space is nadequate to allow eruption, the canine tooth becomes mpacted. In the anterior mandible a similar situation ffects the mandibular premolars, because they erupt fter the mandibular first molar and mandibular canine. herefore if room for eruption is inadequate, one of the remolars, usually the second premolar, remains un-> rupted and becomes impacted as a general rule, all impacted teeth should be removed nless removal is contraindicated. Extraction shuld be performed as soon as the dentist determines that  the tooth is impacted. Removal of impacted teeth become more difficult with advancing age. The dentit should not recommend that impacted teeth be left in place until they cause difficulty. If the tooth is left In until problems arise, the patient may experience anincreased incidence of local tissue morbidity, loss of adjacentteeth and bone, and potential injury to adjacentvital structures. Additionally, if removal of impacted eth is deferred until they cause problems later in life, urgery is more likely to be complicated and hazardous,because the patient may have compromising systemicdiseases. A fundamental precept of the philosopJiy of ,. dentistry is that problems should be prevented. Preventive dentistry dictates that impacted teeth are to be removed before complications arise. This chapter discusses the· management of impacted teeth. It is not a thorough or in-depth discussion of the ‘technical aspects of .swrgical impaction removal. Instead its goal is to provide both the information necessary for proper management and a basis for determining the difficulty of surgery.

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