Feeding Medical Assignment Help

Feeding

Babies with cleft palates can swallow normally once the material being fed reaches the hypopharynx but have extreme difficulty producing the necessary negative pressure in their mouth to allow sucking either breast or milk. When a nipple is placed in the baby’s mouth, he or she starts to suck just like any other newborn, becaese the

FIG. 27-6 A, Facial profile of typical cleft patient. Note pseudoproqnathic appearance of mandible. B, Occlusal relationship of patient showing Angle's Cass III relationshlp with anterior crossbite. C, Lateral ceph.alogram showing maxillary skeletal sagittal deficiency contributing to Cass III occlusal .relationship.

FIG. 27-6 A, Facial profile of typical cleft patient. Note pseudoproqnathic appearance of mandible.
B, Occlusal relationship of patient showing Angle’s Cass III relationshlp with anterior crossbite.
C, Lateral ceph.alogram showing maxillary skeletal sagittal deficiency contributing to Cass III occlusal
.relationship.

sucking and swallowing reflexes are normal. However, the musculature is undeveloped or not properly oriented to allow the sucking to be effective. This problem is easily overcome through the use of specially designed nipples that are elongated and extend further into the baby’s mouth. The .9pening should be enlarged, because the suck will not be as effective as in a normal baby. Other satisfactory methods are the use of eyedroppers or large syringes with rubber extension tubes connected to them. The tube
-is placed in the baby’s mouth, and a small amount of solution is .mjected. These methods of feeding, while adequate for .sustenanc.e, require more time and care. Because the child will swallow a considerable amount of air when these feed methods are used, the child is not usually fed while
recumbent, and more frequent burping is necessary.

 

 

 

Posted by: brianna

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