Category Archives: Principles of Management and Prevention of Odontogenic Infections

Pricniple IV:Treat Infection Surgicaily

Pricniple IV:Treat Infection Surgicaily FIG. 15·8 A, Periapical infection of lower premolar extends through buccal plate and creates sizable, vestibular abscess. B, Abscess is incised with no. 11 blade. C, Beaks of hemostat are inserted throughIncision and opened so that beaks spread to break up any loculations of pus that may exist in abscessedtissue .. 0, Small drain is inserted to depths of abscess cavity with

Prlnciplell: Evaluate State of Patient’s Host Defense Mechanisms

Prlnciplell: Evaluate State of Patient’s Host Defense Mechanisms  Part of the evaluation of the patient’s medical history is designed to establish the patient’s ability to defend • against infection. Several disease states and several types of .drug use may compromise this ability. Compromised FIG, 15–7 Well-localized abscess has crusted surface secondary to tissue necrosis. Mass is f

Principle I: Determine Severity of Infection

Principle I: Determine Severity of Infection Most odontogenic infections are mild and require only minor therapy. When the patient comes for treatment, the initial goal is to assess the severity of the infection. This determination is based on a complete history of the current infectious illness and a physical examination. Complete history. The history of the patient’s infection follows the same general

PRINCIPLES OF THERAPY OF ODONTOGENIC INFECTIONS

PRINCIPLES OF THERAPY OF ODONTOGENIC INFECTIONS This section discusses the management of the odontogenic infection. A series of principles are discussed .that are useful in treating patients who come to the dentist with infections related to the teeth and gingiva. The clinician must keep in mind the information in the preceding two sections of this chapter to understand these prtnciples

NATURAL HISTORY OF PROGRESSION OF ODONTOGENIC INFECTIONS

NATURAL HISTORY OF PROGRESSION OF ODONTOGENIC INFECTIONS Odontogenic infections have.two major origins: (1) periapical, as a result of pulpal necrosis and subsequent bacterial invasion into the periapical tissue, and (2) period on trial periodontal as a result of a deep periodontal pocket that allows inoculation of bacteria into the underlying sof tissues. Of these two, the periapical origin is the most (ommon

MICROBIOLOGY OF ODONTOGENIC INFECTIONS

The bacteria that cause infection are most commonly part of the indigenous bacteria that normally live on or in the host. Odontogenic infections are no exception, because the bacteria that cause odontogenic infections are part of the normal oral flora: those that comprise the bacteria of plaque, those found on the mucosal surfaces, and those ,found in the gingival sulcus. They are primarily aerobic gram-posi

Principles of Management and Prevention of Odontogenic Infections

CHAPTER OUTLINE MICROBIOLOGY OF ODONTOGENIC INFECTIONS NATURAL HISTORY OF PROGRESSION OF ODONTOGENIC INFECTIONS PRINCIPLES ‘OF THERAPY OF ODONTOGENIC INFECTIONS Principle I: Determine Severity of Infection Complete History Physical EXamination . Principle II: Evaluate State of Patient’s Host Defense Mechanisms ‘ . Medical Conditions that Compromise Host Defenses Prindple III: Determine Whether Pat

Infections

Odontogenic infections are usually mild and easily treated and may only requlre the administration of an antibiotic. Conversely, odontogenic infections may be more complex and require an incision and drainage, or they may be complicated and require that the patient he admitted to the hospital. Some infections that occur in the oral cavity are  preventable0 if the surgeon uses appropriate antibiotic prophylaxi