Category Archives: Contemporary Implant Dentistry Edwin

SPECIAL SITUATIONS

SPECIAL SITUATIONS Postextractlon Placement of Implants When implant placeentis planned before extraction of the tooth, consideration should be given to the most desirable time, for implant placement. The implant may be placed immediately (l.e., at the time of extraction), early (Le., 2 months after extraction), or late (Le., more than 6 months after extraction). Each of these times has its indications, advan

Transantral Grafting (Sinus Lift)

Transantral Grafting (Sinus Lift) After tooth loss, alveolar resorption occurs. In the posterior -rnaxilla, crestal bone resorption Js also accompanied by sinus pneumatization. In situations wHere inadequate bone existsto place implants of appropriatelength, sinus floor.augmentation can be performed. Thi, can be dcne-indirectly 0through the implant osteotomy site or directly-by an approach through the lateral w

Alveolar Distraction

Alveolar Distraction 011 grafting techniques are compromised when inadequate soft tissue is present: This is particularly problematic in the anterior maxilla when vertical hard and soft tissue defects e~ist after trauma or treatment of patholo FIG. 14-60 Graft sites from the genial region or tram the buccal shelf. gy. Tightly bound tissue in this area makes primary closure very difficult. Distraction osteogenes

Block Bone Grafting

Block Bone Grafting Guided bone regeneration is most often used for lateral ridge augmentation. Some authors have described vertical augmentation, but it is less predictable. Corticocancellous bone grafts are an a lternative to guided bone regeneration techniques. Bone can be harvested  from the genial region, mandibular all}us, or iliac crest and used to augment lateral or vertical height of the atrophic rid

Block Bone Grafting

Block Bone Grafting Guided bone regeneration is most often used for lateral ridge augmentation. Some authors have described vertical augmentation, but it is less predictable. Corticocancellous bone grafts are an alternative to guided bone regeneration techniques. Bone can be harvested from the genial region, mandibular rall}us, or iliac crest and used to augment lateral or vertical height of the atrophic ridg

ADVANCED SURGICALTECHNIQUES

ADVANCED SURGICAL TECHNIQUES Guided Bone Regeneration Guided bone regeneration is a process that allows bone growth while retarding the ingrowth of fibrous connec- Itive tissue .and epithelium. It is well recognized that most r bone defects will regenerate with new bone if the invao sion.of connective tissue fr.om adjacent soft tissue can be prevented. Guided bone regeneration uses a barrier that is placed ov

Failing Implant

Failing Implant Implant failure occurs at three distinct times: (1) at the time of (or shortly after) stage II surgery, (2) approximately 18 months after stage II surgery, and (3) more than 18 months after stage JI surgery. A few implantswlll fail to integrate. This failure will be identified at the time of (or shortly after) stage II surgery. Failure in this period may be related to a variety of factors. Ove

COMPLICATIONS

COMPLICATIONS Potential- complications include improper angulation or position of the implants; perforation of the inferior border, the maxillary sinus, or the inferior alveolar canal; dehiscence of the buccocortical ‘or iinguocortical plate; mandibular fracture; and soft tissue wound dehiscence. Variation in the position or angulation of the implant results when the anatomy found at surgery requires im

Uncovering

Uncovering The length of time necessary to achieve integration varies from site to site and may require modification based on the particular situation. Successful loading with shorter integration times has been reported when various protocols are followed  (see Table 14-2 for conventionally accepted times for integration based on historical experience, which should serve as a referece point). Although shorte

Postoperative Care

Postoperative Care A radiograph should, be taken postoperatively to evaluate the positron of the implant in relation to adjacent struc- o. tures, such as the’ snus and inferior alveolar canal, and relative to other implants. Patients should be provided analgesics. Mild-to-moderate strength analgesics are usually sufficient. Rarely will ‘ potent oral analgesics be required. Patients should also be