Category Archives: Principles of Management and Prevention of Odontogenic Infections

Prophylaxis Against Total Joint Replacement Infection

Prophylaxis Against Total Joint Replacement Infection Patients who have- undergone total replacement of a joint with a prosthetic joint may be at risk for hematogenous spread of bacteria and subsequent infection. These late. prosthetic joint infections result in severe morbidity, because the implant is usually lost when infections occur. There has been great concern that the bacteremia caused by ‘.tooth

Prophylaxis Against Infectious Endocarditis

Prophylaxis Against Infectious Endocarditis Infectious endocarditis may be caused by bacteria that was ‘introduced into the circulation a~ a result of oral surgery  and that attached to sterile vegetation that exists on an abnormal heart valve. This vegetation can arise because of the turbulent flow around an incompetent heart valve. The turbulent flow causes loss of the surface endocardium, which expos

PRINCIPLES OF PROPHYLAXIS AGAINST METASTATIC INFECTION

PRINCIPLES OF PROPHYLAXIS AGAINST METASTATIC INFECTION Metastatic infection is defined as infection that occurs at a location physically separate from the portal of entry ofthe bacteria. The classic and most widely understood example of this phenomenon is bacterial endocarditis, which arises from bacteria that can be introduced into the circulation as a result of tooth extraction. The incidenceof metastatic inf

Principle V: Use Shortest Antibiotic Exposure That Is Effective

Principle V: Use Shortest Antibiotic Exposure That Is Effective  For the antibiotic prophylaxis to be effective, the antibiotic must be given before the surgery begins, and adequate plasma levels must be maintained during the surgical procedure. Once the surgical procedure is completed, continued antibiotic administration produces no benefit. Therefore the final dose of the antibiotic is usually given after

Principle IV Time Antibiotic Administration Correctly

Principle IV Time Antibiotic Administration Correctly  For the antibiotic to be maximally effective in preventing postoperative _infection the antibiotic must be given before the surgery begins. This principle has been dearly established in many animal and human clinical trials, ‘Antibiotic administration that occurs after surgery either is markedly decreased in its efficacy or has no effect that all 

.Principle I: Procedure Should Have Significant Risk of Infection

Principle I: Procedure Should Have Significant Risk of Infection For prophylactic antibiotics to reduce the incidence of infection, the surgical procedure must have a high enough incidence of infection to be reduced with antibiotic therapy. Clean sun.cry done with strict adherence to . basic surgical principles usually has an incidence of infection of about 3%. Infection rates of 10% or more are usually cons

Principle I: Procedure Should Have Significant Risk of Infection

Principle I: Procedure Should Have Significant Risk of Infection For prophylactic antibiotics to reduce the incidence of infection, the surgical procedure must have a high enough incidence of infection to be reduced with antibiotic therapy. Clean sun.cry done with strict adherence to . basic surgical principles usually has an incidence of infection of about 3%. Infection rates of 10% or more are usually consi

Principle VIII: Evaluate Patient Frequently

Once the patient has been treated by surgeiy and.antiblotic therapy has been prescribed, the patient” should be 0  followed up carefully to monitor response to treatmentand complications. In most situations the patient should 0be asked to return to the dentist 2 days after the origihal therapy. Typically the patient is much improved. If therapy is successful, swelling and pain decreases dramatically. Th

Principle vii: Administer Antibiotic Properly

Principle vii: Administer Antibiotic Properly Once the decision is made to prescribe an antibiotic to .the patient, the drug should be administered in the proper dose and at the proper dose interval. The manufacturer usuallyrecommends the proper dose. It is adequate to provide plasma levels that are sufficiently high to kill the bacteria that are sensitive to the antibiotic but are not so high as to causetoxicit

Principle VI: Choose and Prescribe Appropriate Antibiotic

Principle VI: Choose and Prescribe Appropriate Antibiotic  Choosing the appropriate antibiotic for treating an odontogenic infection must be done carefully. When all factors are weighed, the clinician may decide that no antibiotic is necessary at all, whereas in other situations, broad-spectrum  or even combination antibiotic therapy may be necessary. A variety of factors pust be considered when  hoosing an