Category Archives: Prevention and Manage of Surgical Complications

POSTOPERATIVE BLEEDING

POSTOPERATIVE BLEEDING Extraction of teeth Is a surgical procedure that presents a severe challenge to the- body’s hemostatic mechanism. Several reasons exist for this change First, the tissues of the mouth and jaws are highly vascular. Second” the extraction of a tooth leaves an open wound, with both soft tissue and bone open, which allows additional oozing  and bleeding. Third, it is almost imp

OROANTRAL COMMUNICATLONS

OROANTRAL COMMUNICATLONS Removal of maxillary molars occasionally results in comt munication between the oral cavity and the maxillary sinus. If the maxillary sinus is large, if no bone exists between the roots of the teeth and the maxillary sinus, and if the roots of the tooth are widely divergent, then it is increasingly probable that a portion of the bony floor of the sinus will be removed with the tooth.

INJURIES TO ADJACENT STRUCTURES

INJURIES TO ADJACENT STRUCTURES During the process of tooth extraction, it is possible to injure adjacent tissues. The prudent surgeon preoperatively evaluates all adjacent anatomic areas and designs a surgical procedure to prevent injury to these tissues. FIG. 11-10 Tuberosity removed with maxillary second molar, whicheliminates important prosthetic retention area and exposes maxillarysinus. A, Buccal view of b

INJURIES TO OSSEOUS STRUCTURES

INJURIES TO OSSEOUS STRUCTURES Fracture of Alveolar Process The extraction of a tooth requires that the surrounding alveolar Done be expanded to allow an unimpeded pathway for tooth. removal. However, in some situations the bone fractures and is removed with the tooth instead of expanding. The most likely cause of fracture of the alveolar process is the use of excessive force with forceps, which fractures larg

INJURIES TO ADJACENT TEETH

INJURIES TO ADJACENT TEETH When the dentist extracts a tooth, the tocus ot attention is on that particular tooth and the application of forces to luxate and deliver it. When the surgeon’s total attention is thus focused, likelihood of injury to the adjacent teeth increases. The surgeon should mentally step back from time to time to survey the entire surgical field to prevent injury to adjacent teeth. Fr

COMPLICATIONS WITH THE TOOTH BEING EXTRACTED

COMPLICATIONS WITH THE TOOTH BEING EXTRACTED Root Fracture The most common complication associated with the 00 h being extracted is fracture of its roots. Long, ed, divergent roots that lie in dense bone are most of be fractured. The main method of preventing FIG. 11-2 Small straight elevator can be used as shoehorn to luxatebroken root. When straight elevator is used in this position, handmust be securely suppo

SOFT TISSUE INJURIES

SOFT TISSUE INJURIES Injuries to the soft tissue of the oral cavity are almost  always the result of the surgeon’s lack of adequate attention to the delicate nature of the mucosa and the use of excessive and uncontrolled force. The surgeon must continue to pay careful attention to the soft tissue while working primarily on the bone and tooth structure (Box 11-1). Tearing Mucosal Flap The most common soft

PREVENTION OF COMPLICATIONS

PREVENTION OF COMPLICATIONS It is axiomatic that the best and easiest way to manage a comphcatlon is to prevent it from happening. Prevention of surgical complications is best  accompllshed by a thor~hpreoperative assessment and comprehensive treatment plan. Only when these are routinely performed can fie surgeon expect to have minimal complications. It is I portant to realize that even with such planning, co

INJURIES TO ADJACENT STRUCTURE

INJURIES TO ADJACENT STRUCTURE During the process of tooth extraction, it is possible to injure adjacent tissues. The prudent surgeon preoperatively evaluates all adjacent anatomic areas and designs a surgical procedure to prevent injury to these tissues. FIG. 11-10 Tuberosity removed with maxillary second molar, whicheliminates important prosthetic retention area and exposes maxillarysinus. A, Buccal view of b

INJURIES TO OSSEOUS STRUCTURE

INJURIES TO OSSEOUS STRUCTURE  Fracture of Alveolar Process The extraction of a tooth requires that the surrounding alveolar Done be expanded to allow an unimpeded pathway for tooth. removal. However, in some situations the bone fractures and is removed with the tooth instead of expanding. The most likely cause of fracture of the alveolar process is the use of excessive force with forceps, which fractures lar